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Lock n' Load with R. Lee Ermey Tanks Military Channel Documentary


Lock n' Load with R. Lee Ermey is a television program on History that discussed the development of military weaponry throughout the centuries. It was hosted by R. Lee Ermey. In a typical episode, Ermey focused on one specific type of weapon or weapon system, presenting key advancements in its technology and demonstrating their use with the help of experts. In a holdover from his duties hosting Mail Call on the History Channel, he frequently added humor in the form of light-hearted drill instructor haranguing aimed at the viewer. He also displayed an eagerness to try out the episode's relevant weapons against a wide range of targets, particularly watermelons ("they taste better after being shot with a machine gun"), as well as glass bottles.


The 13-episode series has been rerun semi-regularly since, with reruns currently airing on History 2. The pilot episode was produced by Simon J. Heath and edited by Simon Day (the lead singer of Australian punk band 'RatCat').


The M1 Abrams is an American third-generation main battle tank named for General Creighton Abrams. Highly mobile, designed for modern armored ground warfare, the M1 is well armed and heavily armored. Notable features include a powerful AGT1500 multifuel turbine engine, sophisticated composite armor, and separate ammunition storage in a blow-out compartment for crew safety. Weighing nearly 68 short tons (almost 62 metric tons), it is one of the heaviest main battle tanks in service.


The M1 Abrams entered U.S. service in 1980, ultimately replacing the M60 tank. The M1 is the main battle tank of the United States Army and Marine Corps, and is also used by the armies of Egypt, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Australia, and Iraq.

Three main versions of the M1 Abrams have been deployed, the M1, M1A1, and M1A2, incorporating improved armament, protection, and electronics. These improvements and other upgrades to in-service tanks have allowed this long-serving vehicle to remain in front-line service. In addition, development of the improved M1A3 version was first publicly disclosed in 2009. Extensive improvements have been implemented to the latest M1A2 SEPv3 version.

The Renault FT (frequently referred to in post-World War I literature as the FT-17, FT17, or similar) was a French light tank that was among the most revolutionary and influential tank designs in history. The FT was the first production tank to have its armament within a fully rotating turret. The Renault FT's configuration – crew compartment at the front, engine compartment at the back, and main armament in a revolving turret – became and remains the standard tank layout. As such, some historians of armoured warfare have called the Renault FT the world's first modern tank.

Over 3,000 Renault FT tanks were manufactured by French industry, most of them during 1918. Another 950 of an almost identical licensed copy of the FT (the M1917) were made in the United States, but not in time to enter combat.


The M3 Stuart, officially Light Tank, M3, is an American light tank of World War II. It was supplied to British and other Commonwealth forces under lend-lease prior to the entry of the U.S. into the war. Thereafter, it was used by U.S. and Allied forces until the end of the war.

The British service name "Stuart" came from the American Civil War Confederate general J. E. B. Stuart and was used for both the M3 and the derivative M5 Light Tank. In British service, it also had the unofficial nickname of "Honey" after a tank driver remarked "She's a honey". In U.S. use, the tanks were officially known as "Light Tank M3" and "Light Tank M5".

Stuarts were the first American-crewed tanks in World War II to engage the enemy in tank versus tank combat.

The M18 Hellcat (officially designated the 76 mm Gun Motor Carriage M18 or M18 GMC) was an American tank destroyer of World War II, used in the Italian, European, and Pacific theatres, and in the Korean War. It is the fastest U.S. tank on the road. The speed was attained by keeping armor to a minimum, and by equipping the relatively small vehicle with the same radial engine used on the much larger Sherman tank.


The Hellcat was the most effective U.S. tank destroyer of World War II. It had a higher kill to loss ratio than any tank or tank destroyer fielded by U.S. forces in World War II.


Posted by George Freund on June 9, 2018 at 10:26 PM 205 Views