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TALES OF THE GUN: Ep 28: "M-16"

Replacement Link:

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6v5hgk

Tales of the Gun is a television series broadcast on the History Channel featuring the history of firearms that ran for one season in 1998. The usual episode includes interviews of historians and people who used the featured weapon, shows how the weapons were made, and shows the featured weapon being fired on a shooting range. The series narrator for the US version is Thom Pinto, veteran voice actor.


From top to bottom: M16A1, M16A2, M4A1, M16A4

The M16 rifle, officially designated Rifle, Caliber 5.56 mm, M16, is a United States military adaptation of the ArmaLite AR-15 rifle. The original M16 was a select-fire, 5.56×45mm rifle with a 20-round magazine.

In 1963, the M16 entered United States Military service and was deployed for jungle warfare operations during the Vietnam War. In 1969, the M16A1 replaced the M14 rifle to become the U.S. military's standard service rifle. The M16A1 improvements include a bolt-assist, chromed plated bore and a new 30-round magazine. In 1983, the USMC adopted the M16A2 rifle and the U.S. Army adopted it in 1986. The M16A2 fires the improved 5.56×45mm NATO (M855/SS109) cartridge and has a new adjustable rear sight, case deflector, heavy barrel, improved handguard, pistol grip and buttstock, as well as a semi-auto and three-round burst only fire selector.


The M16 has also been widely adopted by other militaries around the world. Total worldwide production of M16s has been approximately 8 million, making it the most-produced firearm of its 5.56 mm caliber. The U.S. Army has largely replaced the M16 in combat units with the shorter and lighter M4 carbine.

After World War II, the United States military started looking for a single automatic rifle to replace the M1 Garand, M1/M2 Carbines, M1918 Browning Automatic Rifle, M3 "Grease Gun" and Thompson submachine gun.

After modifications (most notably, the charging handle was re-located from under the carrying handle like AR-10 to the rear of the receiver), the new redesigned rifle was renamed the Rifle, Caliber 5.56 mm, M16. Inexplicably, the modification to the new M16 did not include a chrome-lined barrel. Meanwhile, the Army relented and recommended the adoption of the M16 for jungle warfare operations. However, the Army insisted on the inclusion of a forward assist to help push the bolt into battery in the event that a cartridge failed to seat into the chamber. The Air Force, Colt and Eugene Stoner believed that the addition of a forward assist was an unjustified expense. As a result, the design was split into two variants: the Air Force's M16 without the forward assist, and the XM16E1 with the forward assist for the other service branches.

In November 1963, McNamara approved the U.S. Army's order of 85,000 XM16E1s; and to appease General LeMay, the Air Force was granted an order for another 19,000 M16s. In 1964, the Army accepted delivery of the first batch of 2129 rifles and an additional 57,240 rifles the following year.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M16_rifle

We left with 72 men in our platoon and came back with 19, Believe it or not, you know what killed most of us? Our own rifle. Practically every one of our dead was found with his (M16) torn down next to him where he had been trying to fix it.

—Marine Corps Rifleman, Vietnam.

The Marines are slowly saying goodbye to the M16 rifle

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/checkpoint/wp/2015/07/28/the-marines-are-slowly-saying-goodbye-to-the-m16/

Posted by George Freund on September 9, 2015 at 1:23 PM 2534 Views