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Combat! S1 Ep5 Far From the Brave

Combat! is an American television drama series that originally aired on ABC from 1962 until 1967. The exclamation point in Combat! was depicted on-screen as a stylized bayonet. The show covered the grim lives of a squad of American soldiers fighting the Germans in France during World War II. The first-season episode "A Day In June" shows D-Day as a flashback, hence the action occurs during and after June 1944. The program starred Rick Jason as platoon leader Second Lieutenant Gil Hanley and Vic Morrow as Sergeant "Chip" Saunders. Similar to how the main cast alternated episodes in the series Laramie, Jason and Morrow would play the lead in alternating episodes in Combat!.

Combat! premiered on ABC on October 2, 1962, and was broadcast for five seasons to become TV's longest-running World War II drama. In total Combat! aired 152 hour-long episodes. The first 127 episodes, spanning four seasons, were produced in black and white. The fifth and final season produced 25 color episodes. The show was developed by Robert Pirosh, who wrote the pilot episode.


Combat! S1 EP5 Far from the Brave

Episode aired Oct 30, 1962

Sgt. Saunders takes a great risk by giving a new private a Browning Automatic Rifle, when he knows he has other men better qualified with it.

Polish partisan member of Jędrusie unit with Polish version of the M1918 BAR during World War II

This man is behind cover which protects from fire and has a degree of concealment.

No one knows what courage a person has until they are put to the test. Some freeze. Some run. Some can hold the line. It is the sum of all fears that exposes the bluff and bravado. Take careful note. Both BAR men exposed themselves to enemy fire. Rule number one is cover and concentrate available fire power. As circumstances warrant if cover isn't available concealment may be sufficient.


The Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR) is a family of US automatic rifles and machine guns used by the United States and numerous other countries during the 20th century. The primary variant of the BAR series was the M1918, chambered for the .30-06 Springfield rifle cartridge and designed by John Browning in 1917 for the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe as a replacement for the French-made Chauchat and M1909 Benét–Mercié machine guns that US forces had previously been issued.

The BAR was designed to be carried by infantrymen during an assault advance while supported by the sling over the shoulder, or to be fired from the hip. This is a concept called "walking fire"—thought to be necessary for the individual soldier during trench warfare. The BAR never entirely lived up to the original hopes of the War Department as either a rifle or a machine gun.

The US Army, in practice, used the BAR as a light machine gun, often fired from a bipod (introduced on models after 1938). A variant of the original M1918 BAR, the Colt Monitor Machine Rifle, remains the lightest production automatic firearm chambered for the .30-06 Springfield cartridge, though the limited capacity of its standard 20-round magazine tended to hamper its utility in that role.

Although the weapon did see some action in World War I, the BAR did not become standard issue in the US Army until 1938, when it was issued to squads as a portable light machine gun. The BAR saw extensive service in both World War II and the Korean War and saw limited service in the Vietnam War. The US Army began phasing out the BAR in the 1950s, when it was intended to be replaced by a squad automatic weapon (SAW) variant of the M14, and as a result the US Army was without a portable light machine gun until the introduction of the M60 machine gun in 1957.

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Posted by Conspiracy Cafe on May 5, 2022 at 8:17 AM 30 Views