Conspiracy Cafe

Conspiracy, alternative news, history, intelligence agencies

TIMELINE: Armistice: The End Game of WW1


A fresh look at the Armistice of 1918

Professor David Reynolds uncovers a story of wounded egos, political scheming and strategy behind the lines as statesmen and generals haggled over the terms of peace, while the soldiers fought on the front-line.

In a journey that takes him through command centers and battlefields, he explores why half-a-million men were killed or wounded in the bitter endgame of the ‘Great War’ and unravels how Germany ultimately plunged to total defeat. November 11th proved to be a doomed peace, a prelude to a century-long struggle for mastery of Europe. David Reynolds argues that it was the frenetic politicking and brutality of the fighting in 1918 that sowed the seeds of the even bloodier Second World War just 20 years later.

Photograph taken after reaching agreement for the armistice that ended World War I. This is Ferdinand Foch's own railway carriage in the Forest of Compiègne. Foch's chief of staff Maxime Weygand is second from left. Third from the left is the senior British representative, Sir Rosslyn Wemyss. Foch is second from the right. On the right is Admiral George Hope.

The Armistice of 11 November 1918 was the armistice signed at Le Francport near Compiègne that ended fighting on land, sea and air in World War I between the Allies and their opponent, Germany. Previous armistices had been agreed with Bulgaria, the Ottoman Empire and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Also known as the Armistice of Compiègne from the place where it was signed at 5:45 a.m. by the French Marshal Foch,[1] it came into force at 11:00 a.m. Paris time on 11 November 1918 and marked a victory for the Allies and a defeat for Germany, although not formally a surrender.

The actual terms, largely written by the Allied Supreme Commander, Marshal Ferdinand Foch, included the cessation of hostilities, the withdrawal of German forces to behind the Rhine, Allied occupation of the Rhineland and bridgeheads further east, the preservation of infrastructure, the surrender of aircraft, warships, and military materiel, the release of Allied prisoners of war and interned civilians, eventual reparations, no release of German prisoners and no relaxation of the naval blockade of Germany.

Although the armistice ended the fighting on the Western Front, it had to be prolonged three times until the Treaty of Versailles, which was signed on 28 June 1919, took effect on 10 January 1920.


Posted by George Freund on November 19, 2019 at 11:57 AM 19 Views