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McCloud Showdown at Times Square

This seems to be the biggest fragment I can find, but it shows the true meaning of the peace officer. He lawman, priest, brother, and thinker. They were a dying breed then. They are virtually extinct today. Would you risk everything for a stranger or to do what's right?


McCloud is an American television police drama that aired on NBC from 1970 to 1977. The series starred former Gunsmoke regular Dennis Weaver, and for six of its seven years on the air it aired as part of the NBC Mystery Movie wheel series that was produced for the network by Universal Television.

The show was centered around Deputy United States Marshal Sam McCloud of Taos, New Mexico, who was on loan to the New York City Police Department as a special investigator.

History


The first choice for the role of McCloud was Fess Parker, who turned it down.[1] Universal hired the highly experienced Dennis Weaver. The pilot, "Portrait of a Dead Girl", aired on February 17, 1970, and established the premise by having McCloud escort a prisoner from New Mexico to New York City, only to become embroiled in solving a complicated murder case.

This premise of "a cowboy in the big city" was more or less adapted from the 1968 Don Siegel film Coogan's Bluff, starring Clint Eastwood. Herman Miller was responsible for the story of Coogan's Bluff and co-wrote the screenplay with Dean Riesner and Howard A. Rodman. Indeed, Miller is credited as the creator of McCloud. Coogan's Bluff reflects Richard Thorpe's 1942 film Tarzan's New York Adventure and the latter-day career of Bat Masterson. (Siegel appeared in the "Return to the Alamo" episode as "2nd Desk Sergeant".) Like Coogan, McCloud galloped the length and breadth of Manhattan (he was joined by a mounted unit in "The 42nd Street Cavalry"), and the sight of McCloud on horseback riding down the middle of a busy street (taken from an early episode) became one of the series' most famous images.


The westerner in New York City

The most enduring theme of the show was the conflict between the good-natured, clear-eyed buoyancy of McCloud and the metropolitan cynicism of the residents of New York City, including his fellow officers. McCloud's attire, typically consisting of a sheepskin coat or Western jacket, bolo tie and cowboy hat, allowed for implied comic relief in many encounters with New Yorkers. That New Yorkers might mistake him for a naïf because of his appearance occasionally worked to his advantage. He would often allay suspicion of his motives by insisting he was in New York "to observe and learn". McCloud was a Deputy Marshal operating out of the US Marshal's office in Taos. Under his jacket or coat, he usually wore a khaki uniform shirt with a brown star-shaped uniform patch with gold trim on left sleeve. There was a yellow circle in the center with the number 33. He wore two collar pins one was "NM" and the other was "33". McCloud carried a blued .45 Colt SAA with a 4¾" barrel.

INTRO:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kc2wjvoOmVM

The signature of McCloud's character was his Western unflappability and seeming inability to recognize an insult, especially from Clifford, whose jibes ("send in the sagebrush Sherlock Holmes") he never would take personally. Weaver's grin and drawling twang represented McCloud as the embodiment of the American law officer who always sees the good in people but knows the real stakes and spares no pain to catch the bad guy. The character's signature catchphrase was "There ya go!", often received with bemusement or puzzlement by the listener. (One exception was a character played by John Denver; at the end of the show they traded catchphrases, Denver responding "There ya go!" to McCloud's "Far out!")

Posted by George Freund on February 2, 2015 at 1:54 PM 2833 Views