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  • M14 Norinco M305b Review
    by George Freund on September 22, 2013 at 10:40 AM
    6343 Views - 0 Comments

    You'd think they're trying to round up the guns in Kenya. A good staged managed massacre is timely.

    It is illegal in Kenya to own any type of firearm without a valid gun ownership license as spelled out under the Firearms Act (Cap. 114) Laws of Kenya. Anyone who is 12 years or older can apply to privately own a gun. However, such persons must provide in writing to the Chief Licensing Officer (CLO) stating genuine reason(s) for their need to privately own and carry a firearm. It remains at the discretion of the CLO to make a decision to award, deny or revoke a gun ownership license based on the reason(s) given. Anyone seeking to hold a gun license must pass the most stringent of background checks that probes into their past and present criminal, mental health and well as domestic violence records. Failure to pass one of these checks automatically bars one from being permitted to own a firearm. These checks are regularly repeated and must be continually passed for anyone to continue holding the gun license. Failure to pass any of these checks at any stage, means an automatic and immediate revocation of the issued license. Once licensed to own a gun, no permit is required in order to carry around a concealed firearm.

    This is a buy/don't buy review for the Norinco M305b or M14.

    This rifle is lubricated with grease, not oil. Check out this link: http://www.independencearmory.com/dow...

    Civil Advantage Firearms Training is a Canadian company operating out of Vancouver's lower mainland. We specialize in the Canadian Firearms Safety Course, beginner, tactical and live fire training. We train beginners, civilians, federal and municipal police officers, corrections personal and CBSA (border protection).

  • 12 Gauge Coach Gun ( Rossi Overland Doub...
    by George Freund on May 10, 2015 at 6:26 PM
    6322 Views - 0 Comments


    The Overland was manufactured between 1978 to 1994 by Rossi and imported by Amadeo. Imported By Braztech. It was manufactured in a variety of gauges including .410 Bore (Approximately 67-68GA), 12GA, 20GA.

    The Rossi Overland was a very popular shotgun among Cowboy Action Shooters. Its' economical price and classical exposed hammer styling made it popular in using as a vintage shotgun.

    Specifications

    Rossi Overland Calibers: .410 Bore (67 or 68GA), 12GA, 20GA Length: Barrel Length: 20.00 inches, 28.00 inches,

  • The Man from UNCLE S01E01 The Vulcan Aff...
    by George Freund on July 8, 2014 at 10:30 PM
    6299 Views - 0 Comments


    ARCHIVE.ORG:

    The Man from U.N.C.L.E. is an American television series that was broadcast on NBC from September 22, 1964, to January 15, 1968. It follows the exploits of two secret agents, played by Robert Vaughn and David McCallum, who work for a fictitious secret international espionage and law-enforcement agency called U.N.C.L.E. Originally co-creator Sam Rolfe wanted to leave the meaning of U.N.C.L.E. ambiguous so it could be viewed as either referring to "Uncle Sam" or the United Nations. Concerns by the MGM Legal department about possible New York law violations for using the abbreviation "U.N." for commercial purposes resulted in the producers clarifying that U.N.C.L.E. was an acronym for the United Network Command for Law and Enforcement. Each episode of the television show had an "acknowledgement" credit to the U.N.C.L.E. on the end titles.


    "The Vulcan Affair" was the first episode of the television series The Man from U.N.C.L.E. It was edited from the pilot, Solo, which was shot in colour, but was broadcast in black-and-white, to conform with the rest of the first season. It was first broadcast in the USA on NBC on 22 September 1964. The hero is Napoleon Solo and his antagonist is Andrew Vulcan, an evil scientist working with THRUSH. The episode was subsequently expanded with additional footage and released in colour as the feature-length movie, To Trap a Spy.


    Synopsis

    The episode opens with several THRUSH agents raiding the UNCLE headquarters, which is hidden in a tailor shop in New York City. They are at first successful, until Napoleon Solo defeats them. Then, he is assigned to protect an African political leader. He knows that Andrew Vulcan plans to kill or wound him, so he gets a housewife who used to know Vulcan to aid him. They board an airplane and head to Africa. Once there, they go to a party hosted by Vulcan for the African leader and his two friends. There, the housewife flirts with Vulcan (to trap him, of course) and he invites her for a tour of his chemical plant. (He plans to give the African leader and his friends a tour the following day.) Seeing a good espionage chance, she agrees. She distracts Vulcan while Solo sneaks in the plant. Vulcan and his men find them out and pursue them through the plant. They get in a car, and find the African leader inside. Really, he's bad and working with Vulcan; he plans to kill his two friends with an explosion at the plant during their tour. They are captured, and almost killed. Napoleon manages to free them and they rescue the two men. The leader and Vulcan are killed in the explosion.

  • CONSPIRACY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES: Murder B...
    by George Freund on September 27, 2013 at 2:51 PM
    6296 Views - 0 Comments

    I guess I'm showing my age. I saw this when it first came out in the theatre. As the years went by I got connected to the Sutherlands. I shook hands with Kiefer before he went back to New York to go to acting school and make his TV fortune with 24. We were both a little down on our luck at the time. This is a JEWEL. Was the royal family behind the Jack the Ripper case? It opened my mind to possibilities.


    NEW LINK:


    https://ok.ru/video/1032111524532

    Murder by Decree (1979) is a British-Canadian thriller film involving Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson in the case of the serial murderer Jack the Ripper. As Holmes investigates London's most infamous case, he finds that the Ripper has friends in high places.

    The film's story of the plot behind the murders is taken from the book Jack the Ripper: The Final Solution by Stephen Knight. The original script contained the names of the historical suspects, Sir William Gull, 1st Baronet and John Netley. In the actual film, they are referred to as Thomas Spivy (Gull) and William Slade (Netley). This plot device was later used in other Jack The Ripper-themed films.


    The film was directed by Bob Clark. It stars Christopher Plummer and James Mason as Holmes and Watson, respectively, and presents a largely different version of Holmes from the Rathbone days, with the aesthete still prevailing, yet tinged with a humanity and emotional empathy. James Mason's Dr. Watson is also a departure. Although he may appear at first to resemble the bumbling Nigel Bruce version of the character, he soon shows his level head and scientific and medical training to be valuable assets. The supporting cast includes Donald Sutherland, Susan Clark, John Gielgud, Anthony Quayle, David Hemmings and Geneviève Bujold. Frank Finlay plays Inspector Lestrade, a part he had previously portrayed in the similar 1965 film A Study in Terror in which Quayle likewise played a supporting role. Plummer had earlier portrayed Holmes in 1977's Silver Blaze.

    The film was nominated for 8 Genie Awards in 1980, of which it won 5, including Best Achievement in Direction (Bob Clark), Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role (Geneviève Bujold) and Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role (Christopher Plummer).

    Vincent Canby, writing in the NY Times in February 1979, liked the film very much;


    The film, directed by Bob Clark, based on an original screenplay by John Hopkins, makes use not only of the theory that Jack the Ripper was actually the Duke of Clarence, son of Queen Victoria, but also of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, who are apparently in the public domain, or at least available for assignments outside the works of Arthur Conan Doyle.

    With Christopher Plummer as a charming, cultivated Holmes, a fellow who reveals himself to be a man of unexpected social and political conscience, and with James Mason as an especially fond and steadfast Watson, "Murder by Decree" is a good deal of uncomplicated fun, not in a class with Nicholas Meyer's "The Seven Percent Solution," but certainly miles ahead of many other current films that masquerade as popular entertainment.

    Mr. Hopkins's screenplay is funny without being condescending, more aware of history, perhaps, than Conan Doyle's mysteries ever were, but always appreciative of the strengths of the original characters and of the etiquette observed in the course of every hunt.

  • Welcome to The People's Republic of the ...
    by George Freund on February 2, 2013 at 1:38 PM
    6286 Views - 0 Comments


    2013-01j-29

    The illusion masters make you believe anything and you do. Flight 93 fell into a pre-existing hole photographed by the USGS in 1994. A return to Sandy Hook School by a Canadian professor. 9/11 rendition flight to Jonestown I.D. swap meet. VISA goes down Canada wide. Canadian banks downgraded. French cabinet minister says the 'B' word BANKRUPT. Mali gold wwars. Swiss want repatriation of gold reserves. Chicago mayor wages jihad on TD Bank buy a Smith & Wesson. B.I.S. General Manager says we passed the point on QE. Soros says we don't understand derivatives, worries about hyperinflation. Bank of England Governor bemoans worst case scenarios. Million pound note made. Gun control the mopping up operation for the hand over of the United States to China. 257 special economic zones already in the U.S. China moves on land and infrastructure as the repo man. U.S. owes trillions and can't pay. Traitors facilitate the process. Obama prepares shoot to kill agenda on remaining patriots. On Conspiracy Cafe it's welcome to The People's Republic of the United States.

  • THE LOST WORLD OF LAKE VOSTOK
    by George Freund on February 5, 2012 at 8:16 AM
    6269 Views - 0 Comments

    NEW LINK:

    http://www.disclose.tv/action/viewvideo/144865/THE_LOST_WORLD_OF_LAKE_VOSTOK/

    THERE ARE CLAIMS RUSSIAN SCIENTISTS HAVE GONE MISSING AT VOSTOK STATION. THEY MADE A MOVIE ABOUT A CATACLYSM THERE A WHILE BACK CALLED VOSTOK STATION. AL GORE IS IN ANTARCTICA. THIS IS A LITTLE BACKGROUND INFORMATION.

    In 1957 the Russians established a remote base in Antarctica -- the Vostok station. It soon became a byword for hardship -- dependent on an epic annual 1000km tractor journey from the coast for its supplies. The coldest temperature ever found on Earth (-89°C) was recorded here on the 21st July 1983. It's an unlikely setting for a lake of liquid water. But in the 1970's a British team used airborne radar to see beneath the ice, mapping the mountainous land buried by the Antarctic ice sheet. Flying near the Vostok base their radar trace suddenly went flat. They guessed that the flat trace could only be from water. It was the first evidence that the ice could be hiding a great secret.

    But 20 years passed before their suspicions were confirmed, when satellites finally revealed that there was an enormous lake under the Vostok base. It is one of the largest lakes in the world -- at 10,000 square km it's about the extent of Lake Ontario, but about twice as deep (500m in places). The theory was that it could only exist because the ice acts like a giant insulating blanket, trapping enough of the earth's heat to melt the very bottom of the ice sheet.

  • U.S. Survival Rifle 22LR Semi-Auto AR-7 ...
    by George Freund on September 10, 2013 at 10:33 PM
    6228 Views - 0 Comments

    Fun Gun Reviews Presents : The U.S. Survival Rifle. This super lightweight 22LR semi-automatic rifle breaks down into four pieces that can be store away into the waterproof stock. Made by Henry Repeating Arms, this handy little rifle is perfect for hikers, campers, fisherman, bush pilots, or anyone who spents time in the great outdoors!

    The ArmaLite AR-7 Explorer, designed by M-16 inventor Eugene Stoner, is a semi-automatic .22 Long Rifle rifle developed from the AR-5 adopted by the U.S. Air Force as a pilot and aircrew survival weapon. Its intended markets today are backpackers and other recreational users as a take-down utility rifle. The AR-7 is often recommended by outdoor users of recreational vehicles (automobile, airplane or boat) who might have need for a weapon for foraging or defense in a wilderness emergency.

    History & design

    The prototype of what would become the AR-7 was designed by Eugene Stoner at ArmaLite Inc., a division of Fairchild Aircraft. The rifle shares some of the features of the bolt-action AR-5, another rifle designed by Stoner for ArmaLite and adopted by the United States Air Force in 1956 as the MA-1.[1] The MA-1 was intended to replace the M4 Survival Rifle and the M6 Aircrew Survival Weapon which was a superimposed ("over-under") twin-barrel rifle/shotgun chambered in .22 Hornet and .410 bore, using a break-open action. The AR-5 had the advantage of repeat fire over the then-standard M6, using the same .22 Hornet cartridge. When the AR-5 was adopted as the MA-1 but was not placed in issue due to the numbers of M4 and M6 survival weapons in USAF inventory, ArmaLite used the research and tooling for the AR-5 in developing the AR-7 for the civilian market.

    Armalite AR-7 Explorer internal parts assembled (left sideplate removed)

    The AR-7 uses a blowback semi-automatic action in .22 Long Rifle but retains the AR-5/MA-1 feature of storing the disassembled parts within the hollow stock, which is filled with plastic foam and capable of floating.[3][4] Like the bolt-action AR-5, the AR-7 was designed as a survival rifle for foraging small game for food. The AR-7 is constructed primarily of aluminum, with plastic for the stock and buttcap. Even the barrel is aluminum (in later production composite material), using a rifled steel barrel liner.[5] The AR-7 measures 35 inches overall when assembled. It disassembles to four sections (barrel, action, stock, and magazine), with three parts storing inside the plastic stock measuring 16 inches long. The rifle weighs 2.5 pounds light enough for convenient backpacking. The rear sight is a peep sight, which comes on a flat metal blade with an aperture (in later production two different size apertures), and is adjustable for elevation (up-down). The front sight is adjustable for windage (side-side). Accuracy is sufficient for hunting small game at ranges to 50 yards.

    Criticism

    Reliability of the AR-7 is highly dependent on the condition of the magazine and on the ammunition used, perhaps more so than with other models of semi-automatic .22 caliber rifles. The feed ramp is part of the magazine and subject to damage from mishandling. Flat-nosed bullets tend to jam on the edge of the chamber of the barrel. The transition of cartridge from magazine to barrel can be smoothed by minor beveling of the chamber of the barrel, by using round-nosed as opposed to flat-nosed bullets and by paying attention to condition of the feed lips and feed ramp of the magazine. Later production magazines include an external wire spring to align the cartridge; earlier magazines used two pinch marks at the top of the magazine body, which could become worn over time.

    All iterations of the AR-7 from the Armalite to the Henry use bolt and dual recoil springs that are heavy compared to most other .22 semiautomatics. The AR-7 requires high velocity ammunition for reliable functioning. The manufacturer recommends use of 40 grain round nose bullets in high velocity loadings. It is still possible to manually load a single round into the firing chamber, allowing use of flat nosed bullets or low velocity or subsonic ammunition.

    The barrel takedown nut tends to loosen after firing and may need hand tightening to maintain both accuracy and reliability.

    Armalite sold the design to Charter Arms in 1973. According to some accounts posted by enthusiasts, this is where quality began to deteriorate.[6] Barrels were said to have a tendency to warp. Other sources state that the first production at Charter had problems which were corrected in later production runs.[2] Since Charter Arms sold the design and rights to Henry Repeating Arms in 1980, the Henry AR-7 has regained a reputation for reliability.

    Production history

    (Summary of information available in The Blue Book of Gun Values)

    1959-1973: ArmaLite

    1973-1990: Charter Arms

    1990-1997: Survival Arms, Cocoa, Florida

    1997–Present: Henry Repeating Arms Co., Brooklyn, New York

    1998-2004: AR-7 Industries, LLC, Meriden, Connecticut (bought by ArmaLite in 2004)

     

  • Makarov 9x18 ( Russian Military Model)
    by George Freund on July 24, 2015 at 6:06 PM
    6214 Views - 0 Comments


    The Makarov pistol or PM is a Russian semi-automatic pistol. Under the project leadership of Nikolay Fyodorovich Makarov, it became the Soviet Union's standard military and police side arm from 1951 to 1991.

    Development

    The Makarov pistol resulted from a design competition for replacing the Tokarev TT-33 semi-automatic pistol and the Nagant M1895 revolver.[2] Rather than building a pistol to an existing cartridge in the Soviet inventory, Nikolai Makarov took up the German wartime Walther "Ultra" design, fundamentally an enlarged Walther PP, utilizing the 9×18mm Makarov cartridge designed by B.V. Semin in 1946. For simplicity and economy, the Makarov pistol was of straight blowback operation, with the 9×18mm Makarov cartridge being the most powerful cartridge it could safely fire. The Luftwaffe had rejected this pistol design some years before because of its poor accuracy. Although the nominal calibre was 9.0mm, the actual bullet was 9.22mm in diameter, being shorter and wider and thus incompatible with pistols chambered for 9×19mm Parabellum cartridges.


    In 1951, the PM was selected because of its simplicity (few moving parts), economy, ease of manufacturing, and reasonable stopping power.[3] It remained in wide front-line service with Soviet military and police until and beyond the end of the USSR in 1991. Variants of the pistol remain in production in Russia, China, and Bulgaria. In the U.S., surplus Soviet and East German military Makarovs are listed as eligible curio and relic items by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, because the countries of manufacture, the USSR and the GDR, no longer exist.[4]

    In 2003, the Makarov PM was formally replaced by the Yarygin PYa pistol in Russian service,[2] although as of 2012, large numbers of Makarov PMs are still in Russian military and police service. The Makarov PM is still the service pistol of many Eastern European and former Soviet republics. North Korea and Vietnam also use Makarov PMs as standard-issue pistols.


    The 9×18mm Makarov (designated 9mm Makarov by the C.I.P. and often called 9×18mm PM) is a Russian pistol and submachine gun cartridge. During the latter half of the 20th Century it was a standard military pistol cartridge of the Soviet Union and the Eastern Bloc, analogous to the 9×19mm Parabellum in NATO and Western military use.

  • CONSPIRACY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES: Doctor Z...
    by George Freund on December 19, 2013 at 9:41 AM
    6210 Views - 0 Comments

    Doctor Zhivago is a British 1965 epic drama?romance film directed by David Lean, starring Omar Sharif and Julie Christie. The film is loosely based on the famous novel of the same name by Boris Pasternak. It has remained popular for decades and as of 2013 is the eighth highest-grossing film of all time, adjusted for inflation.

    Background

    Boris Pasternak's 1957 novel was published in the West amidst celebration and controversy. Parts of Pasternak's book had been known in Samizdat since some time after World War II. However, the novel was not completed until 1956. The book had to be smuggled out of the Soviet Union by an Italian called D'angelo to whom Pasternak had entrusted the book to be delivered to Giangiacomo Feltrinelli, a left-wing Italian publisher who published it shortly thereafter. Helped by a Soviet campaign against the novel, it became a sensation throughout the non-communist world. It spent 26 weeks atop the New York Times best-seller list.


    A great lyric poet, Pasternak was awarded the 1958 Nobel Prize for Literature. While the citation noted his poetry, it was understood that the prize was mainly for Doctor Zhivago, which the Soviet government saw as an anti-Soviet work, thus interpreting the award of the Nobel Prize as a gesture hostile to the Soviet Union. A target of the Soviet government's vituperative campaign to denigrate him as a traitor, Pasternak felt compelled to refuse the Prize. The situation became an international cause célèbre and made Pasternak a Cold War symbol of resistance to Soviet communism, a role the poet was ill-suited for.

    The film, though faithful to the novel's plot, is noticeably different in the depictions of several characters and events. Many critics believed that the film's focus on the love story between Zhivago and Lara trivialized the events of the Russian Revolution and the resulting civil war.

    The sweeping multi-plotted story form used by Pasternak had a distinguished pedigree in Russian letters. The author of War and Peace, Leo Tolstoy, had used characters as symbols of classes and historical events in describing the events in the Russia of Napoleonic times. Pasternak's father, who was a painter, had produced illustrations for War and Peace. The name "Zhivago" is rooted in the Russian word "zhiv" ("life") and zhivago is Church Slavonic for "the living".


    In the true manner of the Russian epic novel, characters constantly meet due to coincidence, though this is less apparent in the film.

    Plot

    The film takes place mostly against a backdrop of World War I and the Russian Revolution. A narrative framing device, set in the late 1940s to early 1950s, involves KGB Lieutenant General Yevgraf Andreyevich Zhivago (Alec Guinness) searching for the daughter of his half brother, Doctor Yuri Andreyevich Zhivago (Omar Sharif), and Larissa ("Lara") Antipova (Julie Christie). Yevgraf believes a young woman, Tonya Komarova (Rita Tushingham) may be his niece and tells her the story of her father's life.

    When Yuri Zhivago is orphaned after his mother's death, he is taken in by his mother's friends, Alexander "Sasha" (Ralph Richardson) and Anna (Siobhán McKenna) Gromeko, and grows up with their daughter Tonya (Geraldine Chaplin).

    In 1913, Zhivago as a medical student in training, but a poet at heart, meets Tonya as she returns to Moscow after a long trip to Paris. Lara, meanwhile, becomes involved in an affair with Victor Ipolitovich Komarovsky (Rod Steiger), a friend of her mother's (Adrienne Corri). That night, the idealistic reformer Pavel Pavlovich ("Pasha") Antipov (Tom Courtenay) drifts into left-wing extremism after being wounded by sabre-wielding Cossacks during a peaceful demonstration. Pasha runs to Lara, whom he wants to marry, to treat his wound. He asks her to hide a gun he picked up at the demonstration. Lara's mother discovers her affair with Komarovsky and attempts suicide. Komarovsky summons help from the physician. Zhivago arrives as the physician's assistant. When Komarovsky learns of Lara's intentions to marry Pasha, he tries to dissuade Lara, and then rapes her. In revenge, Lara takes the pistol she has been hiding for Pasha and shoots Komarovsky at a Christmas Eve party, wounding him. Komarovsky insists no action be taken against Lara, who is escorted out by Pasha. Zhivago tends Komarovsky's wound. Although enraged and devastated by Lara's affair with Komarovsky, Pasha marries Lara, and they have a daughter named Katya.

    During World War I, Yevgraf Zhivago is sent by Russian Social Democratic Labour Party to subvert the Imperial Russian Army for the Bolsheviks. Pasha is reported missing in action following a daring charge attack on German forces. Lara enlists as a nurse to search for him. Yuri Zhivago is drafted and becomes a battlefield doctor.


    During the February Revolution, Zhivago enlists Lara's help to tend to the wounded. Together they run a field hospital for six months, during which time radical changes ensues throughout Russia as Vladimir Lenin arrives in Moscow. Before their departure, Yuri and Lara fall in love. Yuri must remain loyal to Tonya, whom he already married.

    After the war, Yuri returns to his wife Tonya, son Sasha, and Alexander, whose house in Moscow has been divided into tenements by the new Soviet government. Yevgraf, now a member of the CHEKA, informs him his poems have been condemned by Soviet censors as antagonistic to Communism. Yevgraf arranges for passes and documents in order for Yuri and his family to escape from the new political capital of Moscow to the far away Gromeko estate at Varykino, in the Ural Mountains. Zhivago, Tonya, Sasha and Alexander now board a heavily guarded cattle train, at which time they are informed that they will be travelling through contested territory, which is being secured by the infamous Bolshevik commander named Strelnikov.

    While the train is stopped, Zhivago wanders away. He stumbles across the armoured train of Strelnikov himself sitting on a hidden siding. Yuri recognises Strelnikov as the former Pasha Antipov. After a tense interview, Strelnikov informs Yuri that Lara is now living in the town of Yuriatin, then occupied by anti-Communist White Army. He allows Zhivago to return to his family, although it is hinted by Strelnikov's right-hand man most people interrogated by Strelnikov end up being shot.

    The family lives a peaceful life in Varykino until Zhivago finds Lara in nearby Yuriatin. At which point they surrender to their long repressed feelings. When Tonya becomes pregnant, Yuri breaks off with Lara, only to be abducted and conscripted into service by Communist partisans.


    After two years, Zhivago at last deserts, trudging through the deep snow to Yuriatin, and finds Lara. After six months, Lara reveals a letter from Tonya, in which she tells Yuri that she, her father, and Sasha have been deported to Paris, and had met with Lara while searching for the long-lost Yuri.

    One night, Komarovsky arrives and informs them they are being watched by the CHEKA due to Lara's marriage to Strelnikov and Yuri's "counter-revolutionary" poetry and desertion. Komarovsky offers Yuri and Lara his help in leaving Russia. They refuse. Instead, they go to the isolated Varykino estate, where Yuri begins writing the "Lara" poems, which will later make him famous but incur government displeasure. Komarovsky reappears and tells Yuri that Strelnikov committed suicide while being taken to his execution. Therefore, Lara is in immediate danger, as the CHEKA has only left her free to lure Strelnikov into the open. Zhivago sends Lara away with Komarovsky, who has become an official in the Far East. Refusing to leave with a man he despises, Yuri remains behind.

    Years later in Moscow, during the Stalinist era, Yuri sees Lara while travelling on a tram. Forcing his way off the tram, he runs after her, at which point he suffers a fatal heart attack. Yuri's funeral is well attended, as his poetry is already being published openly due to shifts in politics. Lara informs Yevgraf she had given birth to Yuri's daughter, but lost her in the collapse of the White-controlled government in Mongolia. After vainly looking over hundreds of orphans with Yevgraf's help, Lara disappears during Joseph Stalin's Great Purge, and "died or vanished somewhere...in one of the labour camps," according to Yevgraf.

    While Yevgraf strongly believes that Tonya Komarova is Yuri's and Lara's daughter, she is still not convinced. Yevgraf notices that Tonya carries with her a balalaika. Finding Tonya learned to play the balalaika by herself, he smiles, "Ah, then, it's a gift," thereby implying she truly must be their daughter after all.

  • ONLY THE POLICE AND THE MILITARY SHOULD ...
    by George Freund on December 30, 2012 at 11:18 AM
    6187 Views - 0 Comments

    Jallianwala Bagh massacre


    -

    The Jallianwala Bagh massacre (also known as the Amritsar massacre), took place in the Jallianwala Bagh public garden in the northern Indian city of Amritsar on 13 April 1919. The shooting that took place was ordered by Brigadier-General Reginald E.H. Dyer.

    On Sunday 13 April 1919, Dyer was convinced of a major insurrection and thus he banned all meetings. On hearing that a meeting of 15,000 to 20,000 people including women, senior citizens and children had assembled at Jallianwala Bagh, Dyer went with fifty riflemen to a raised bank and ordered them to shoot at the crowd. Dyer kept the firing up till the ammunition supply was almost exhausted for about ten minutes with approximately 1,650 rounds fired.[1] Official Government of India sources estimated that the fatalities were 379, with 1,100 wounded. The casualty number estimated by Indian National Congress was more than 1,500, with approximately 1,000 dead.[2]

    Dyer was removed from duty and forced to retire. He became a celebrated hero in Britain among people with connections to the British Raj.[3] The massacre caused a reevaluation of the Army's role in which the new policy became minimum force, and the Army was retrained and developed suitable tactics such as crowd control.[4] Historians considered the episode as a decisive step towards the end of British rule in India.[5]

    The massacre

    On April 13, the traditional festival of Vaisakhi, thousands of Sikhs, Muslims and Hindus gathered in the Jallianwala Bagh (garden) near the Harmandir Sahib in Amritsar.

    An hour after the meeting began as scheduled at 4:30 pm, Dyer arrived with a group of sixty-five Gurkha and twenty-five Baluchi soldiers into the Bagh. Fifty of them were armed with rifles. Dyer had also brought two armoured cars armed with machine guns; however, the vehicles were left outside, as they were unable to enter the Bagh through the narrow entrance. The Jallianwala Bagh was surrounded on all sides by houses and buildings and had few narrow entrances. Most of them were kept permanently locked. The main entrance was relatively wide, but was guarded by the troops backed by the armoured vehicles.

    Dyer—without warning the crowd to disperse—blocked the main exits. He explained later that this act "was not to disperse the meeting but to punish the Indians for disobedience."[14] Dyer ordered his troops to begin shooting toward the densest sections of the crowd (including women and children). Firing continued for approximately ten minutes. Cease-fire was ordered only when ammunition supplies were almost exhausted, after approximately 1,650 rounds were spent.[1]

    Many people died in stampedes at the narrow gates or by jumping into the solitary well on the compound to escape the shooting. A plaque in the monument at the site, set up after independence, says that 120 bodies were pulled out of the well. The wounded could not be moved from where they had fallen, as a curfew was declared; and many more died during the night.

    The number of deaths caused by the shooting is disputed. While the official figure given by the British inquiry into the massacre is 379 deaths, the method used by the inquiry has been subject to criticism. In July 1919, three months after the massacre, officials were tasked with finding who had been killed by inviting inhabitants of the city to volunteer information about those who had died.[15] This information was incomplete due to fear that those who participated would be identified as having been present at the meeting, and some of the dead may not have had close relations in the area.[16] Additionally, a senior civil servant in the Punjab interviewed by the members of the committee admitted that the actual figure could be higher.[17]

    Since the official figures were probably flawed regarding the size of the crowd (15,000–20,000), the number of rounds shot and the period of shooting, the politically interested Indian National Congress instituted a separate inquiry of its own, with conclusions that differed considerably from the Government's inquiry. The casualty number quoted by the Congress was more than 1,500, with approximately 1,000 being killed.[18] The Government tried to suppress information of the massacre, but news spread in India and widespread outrage ensued. Yet, the details of the massacre did not become known in Britain until December 1919.


    -

    This image had Facebook suspend Natural News' account. It is the truth. Gandhi made statements on same. Facebook is a CIA trolling operation. Facebook does NOT believe in Free Speech. As a corporation of the military industrial complex, it is designed to destroy you. They SPIT on Freedom of Speech. To HELL with the TRAITORS at Facebook.

  • CONSPIRACY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES: The Cat'...
    by George Freund on February 9, 2014 at 7:31 AM
    6184 Views - 0 Comments

    Where speculation is rife and opinion plenty, the main fact for a sinister motive was probably the fact that Thomas Ince was an INDEPENDENT film maker. As the 1920's came along the studios took control of mass public opinion shaping. Thomas loaned money to INDEPENDENT film producers. As a foil Hearst was in the opinion cartel with his newspapers. Ultimately the fact of the matter was more a battle of ideals on controlling the masses with the control of a woman being a secondary matter. Charlie Chaplin was the Hollywood icon loved my millions. He'd have been lynched by angry mobs and his news empire shattered if he killed him. However, Thomas Ince would be another matter. He was just a name on a screen not associated with the emotions of the masses. Jump ahead to today and think of the Murdoch news empire. Nothing has changed. Many things happen on yachts. Most often the truth is lost at sea. It was Heart's granddaughter, Patricia Hearst, that got the ball really rolling with a 1996 novel Murder at San Simeon.

    Patricia Hearst Symbionese Liberation Army terrorist or Stockholm Syndrome victim or MK Ultra graduate

    It's all theatre of the mind this perspective of the world we have. It is shaped and massaged for us giving us the illusion of free will. They fight over it, and kill for it. It is the ultimate power. They still do. That is why Hollywood is such a battleground. Unsuspecting actors find out things and are eliminated. Enjoy the film. Your thoughts are liberated for you to form. MEOW!

    FULL MOVIE UPDATED: 


    The Cat's Meow is a 2001 period drama film directed by Peter Bogdanovich, and starring Kirsten Dunst, Eddie Izzard, Edward Herrmann, Cary Elwes, Joanna Lumley and Jennifer Tilly. The screenplay by Steven Peros is based on his play of the same title, which was inspired by the mysterious death of film mogul Thomas H. Ince.

    The film takes place aboard publisher William Randolph Hearst's yacht on a weekend cruise celebrating Ince's 42nd birthday in November 1924. Among those in attendance are Hearst's longtime companion and film actress Marion Davies, fellow actor Charlie Chaplin, writer Elinor Glyn, columnist Louella Parsons, and actress Margaret Livingston. The celebration is cut short by an unusual death that would go on to become the subject of legendary Hollywood folklore.

    Plot

    "All you have to do to make Hearst turn white as a ghost is mention Ince's name. There's plenty wrong there, but Hearst is too big." - D.W. Griffiths

    November 15, 1924: Among those boarding the luxury yacht Oneida in San Pedro, California are its owner, publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst, and his mistress, silent film star Marion Davies; Thomas H. Ince, whose birthday is the reason for the weekend cruise, and his mistress, starlet Margaret Livingston; Charlie Chaplin; English writer Elinor Glyn; and Louella Parsons, the film critic for Hearst's New York American.

    Several of those participating in the weekend's festivities are at a crossroads in their lives and/or careers. Chaplin, still dealing with the critical and commercial failure of A Woman of Paris and rumors he has impregnated 16-year-old Lita Grey (who appeared in his film The Kid) is in the midst of preparing The Gold Rush. Davies longs to appear in a slapstick comedy rather than the somber costume dramas to which Hearst has kept her confined. Ince's eponymous film studio is in dire financial straits, and he hopes to convince Hearst to take him on as a partner in Cosmopolitan Pictures. Parsons would like to relocate from the East Coast to more glamorous Hollywood.

    Marion Davies welcomes Ince aboard the yacht

    Hearst suspects Davies and Chaplin have engaged in an affair, a suspicion shared by Ince, who hopes to find proof he can present to Hearst in order to curry favor with him. In the wastepaper basket in Chaplin's stateroom, he discovers a discarded love letter to Davies and pockets it with plans to produce it at an opportune moment. When he finally does, Hearst is enraged. His anger is fueled further when he finds a brooch he had given Davies in Chaplin's cabin. Hearst concludes it was lost there during a romantic liaison, and he rifles Marion's room for further evidence.

    Elinor Glyn

    Armed with a pistol, Hearst searches the yacht for Chaplin in the middle of the night. Ince, meanwhile runs into Davis and the two sit and talk with Ince donning a hat Chaplin had worn. Davies explains to Ince her love for Hearst and her regret at an earlier affair with Chaplin. She states "I never loved him" just as Hearst arrives behind them. Thinking Davies is referring to him, and mistaking Ince for Chaplin, Hearst shoots Ince. The assault is witnessed by Parsons who had been seeking out Hearst to make her case for a new job.

    The Oneida purveyor of secrets at sea

    Hearst arranges to dock in San Diego and have a waiting ambulance take the dying Ince to his home. He phones the injured man's wife and tells her Ince attempted suicide when Livingston tried to end their affair, and assures her he will make sure the truth does not reach the media. To the rest of his guests he announces Ince's ulcer flared up during the night and he is in need of immediate medical attention. Davies, of course, knows the truth, and confides in Chaplin. Also aware of the truth is Parsons, who had left her cabin to investigate the mysterious noises she heard and witnessed the shooting. Parsons assures Hearst his secret will be safe in exchange for a lifetime contract with the Hearst Corporation, thus laying the groundwork for her lengthy career as one of Hollywood's most powerful gossip columnists.

    After seeing Ince off, Hearst confronts Davies and Chaplin. Chaplin berates Hearst for what he has done and expects Davies to join him. Hearst however challenges Chaplin to guarantee Davies that he can promise her a happy life. When Chaplin fails to answer, Hearst informs Chaplin of the vow of silence he and the fellow guests have made to keep the weekend's activities a secret. Chaplin despairs as he realizes the murder has strengthened Davies' love for Hearst.

    The film concludes with the guests leaving Ince's funeral, as Glyn relates what became of them:

    Livingston went on to star in a number of successful films and her film salary "inexplicably" went from $300 to $1000 a film.

    Davies starred in more of Hearst's films before finally being allowed to feature in a comedy The Hollywood Revue of 1929, which was (as Chaplin predicted) a success. She stayed by Hearst's side until his death in 1951.

    Chaplin married his teenage lover Lita Grey in Mexico and his film The Gold Rush was an overwhelming success.

    Parsons worked for Hearst for many years and subsequently became one of the most successful writers in the history of American journalism.

    Tom Ince was largely forgotten after the events of his death. Very few newspapers reported it, no police action was taken, and of all the people on board only one was ever questioned, and in Hollywood, "the place just off the coast of the planet Earth", no two accounts of the story are the same.

  • Timewatch - Bombing Germany (BBC 2001)
    by George Freund on February 12, 2015 at 9:05 AM
    6152 Views - 0 Comments


    Timewatch is a long-running British television series showing documentaries on historical subjects, spanning all human history. It was first broadcast on 29 September 1982 and is produced by the BBC, the Timewatch brandname is used as a banner title in the UK, but many of the individual documentaries are unbranded with BBC continuity outside the domestic British market.

    12 "Bombing Germany" 23 August 2001John Michie3.002002

    While many remember the bombing of Dresden, which resulted in the deaths of 30,000 people, this programme uncovers the reasons behind the extensive Allied attacks on other German towns during the final stages of World War Two. Historians Martin Middlebrook and Professor Tami Biddle explore the facts behind the devastation and conclude that targets were often selected on the basis of ease of destruction rather than military importance.


    The destruction of Dresden in the Second World War has come to epitomise the horrors of modern aerial warfare. Thirty thousand people died during two nights of bombing, yet Dresden was only one of many German towns to suffer Allied saturation bombing. In the last months of the war, American and British bombers wrought havoc on numerous small towns considered at the time to be of little military importance. Timewatch sheds new light on the final stages of the Allied strategic bombing campaign.

    Drawing on the expertise of renowned historians Martin Middlebrook and Professor Tami Biddle, and using rare colour archive and dramatic reconstructions, Detlef Siebert's film explores the historical background of strategic bombing in the Second World War. Through the testimonies of both airmen and civilians, the film tells the story of one American and one British raid on two South German towns of minor military importance.


    Ellingen, a small town with 1,500 inhabitants in Bavaria, was bombed by the 8th American Air Force in February 1945. An interview with the lead navigator reveals that Ellingen was selected as a "target of opportunity" simply because it had a road running through it. A few weeks later, British Bomber Command attacked Wurzburg, a medium-sized town with next to no industry of military importance. In only 20 minutes, incendiary bombs destroyed 82 per cent of the town, an even greater proportion than in Dresden.

    Timewatch has unearthed documents which help to explain why such an unimportant place as Wurzburg was bombed. The documents provide a fascinating insight into the target selection process. They show that once Germany's industrial centres were virtually all destroyed, Bomber Command Intelligence began to select towns initially, not for their military value, but because they were easy for the bombers to find and destroy. A briefing note by an American Air Force general shows that raids on rural places such as Ellingen also had the political purpose to deter the Germans from ever starting another war.

    Director and writer: Detlef Siebert

    Narrator: John Michie

    BBC and History Channel co-production (2001)


    "The Nazis entered this war under the rather childish delusion that they were going to bomb everybody else, and nobody was going to bomb them. At Rotterdam, London, Warsaw, and half a hundred other places, they put that rather naive theory into operation. They sowed the wind, and now, they are going to reap the whirlwind". Sir Arthur Harris 1st Baronet. 1942.


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