Conspiracy Cafe

Conspiracy, alternative news, history, intelligence agencies

CCTV (Conspiracy-Cafe TV)

 

WHEN REALITY IS CONSPIRACY THEN BY DEFINITION CONSPIRACY MUST BE REALITY!

It appears the forces of darkness have pulled the plug on Putlocker.is. However, stay tuned media junkies there is another location to get your fix.


They are being reinserted over the next couple of months. You will find some already. You will find the rest over time. It is an arduous struggle the maintenance of freedom. The lies are exposed here. That makes evil feel threatened. The best books are banned or burned. The best videos are pulled as well. Every one is supported by evidence linked for your perusal. The enemies of freedom hate the truth because it sets us free, and they have determined us to be slaves. Click in this site and emancipate yourself. 

 
Sort: Recent | Popular Grid List
  • John Perkins Confessions of an Economic ...
    by George Freund on July 26, 2012 at 11:31 PM
    4045 Views - 0 Comments

    NEW LINK:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpRV2YmyxCE

    - JOHN PERKINS - http://www.johnperkins.org/ EXTENDED INTERVIEW FROM THE FILM "ZEITGEIST: ADDENDUM" 2008

  • U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Gi...
    by George Freund on February 12, 2012 at 4:36 PM
    4044 Views - 0 Comments

    NEW LINK:

    http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2012/02/03/ruth_bader_ginsburg_to_egypt_dont_use_us_constitution_as_a_model.html


    This is a wake up call....... and it is chilling

    February 6, 2012

    We the People Loses Appeal With People Around the World

    By ADAM LIPTAK WASHINGTON  

    The Constitution has seen better days. Sure, it is the nation's founding document and sacred text. And it is the oldest written national constitution still in force anywhere in the world. But its influence is waning.

    In 1987, on the Constitution?s bicentennial, Time magazine calculated that of the 170 countries that exist today, more than 160 have written charters modeled directly or indirectly on the U.S. version.

    A quarter-century later, the picture looks very different. The U.S. Constitution appears to be losing its appeal as a model for constitutional drafters elsewhere, according to a new study by David S. Law of Washington University in St. Louis and Mila Versteeg of the University of Virginia.

    The study, to be published in June in The New York University Law Review, bristles with data. Its authors coded and analyzed the provisions of 729 constitutions adopted by 188 countries from 1946 to 2006, and they considered 237 variables regarding various rights and ways to enforce them.  

    Among the world's democracies, Professors Law and Versteeg concluded, constitutional similarity to the United States has clearly gone into free fall. Over the 1960s and 1970s, democratic constitutions as a whole became more similar to the U.S. Constitution, only to reverse course in the 1980s and 1990s.

    The turn of the twenty-first century, however, saw the beginning of a steep plunge that continues through the most recent years for which we have data, to the point that the constitutions of the world?s democracies are, on average, less similar to the U.S. Constitution now than they were at the end of World War II.

    There are lots of possible reasons. The United States Constitution is terse and old, and it guarantees relatively few rights. The commitment of some members of the Supreme Court to interpreting the Constitution according to its original meaning in the 18th century may send the signal that it is of little current use to, say, a new African nation. And the Constitution's waning influence may be part of a general decline in American power and prestige.

    In an interview, Professor Law identified a central reason for the trend: the availability of newer, sexier and more powerful operating systems in the constitutional marketplace. Nobody wants to copy Windows 3.1, he said.

    Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg would recomend the South African Constitution ..............

    In a television interview during a visit to Egypt last week, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg of the Supreme Court seemed to agree. I would not look to the United States Constitution if I were drafting a constitution in the year 2012, she said. She recommended, instead, the South African Constitution, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms or the European Convention on Human Rights.

    The rights guaranteed by the American Constitution are parsimonious by international standards, and they are frozen in amber. As Sanford Levinson wrote in 2006 in Our Undemocratic Constitution, the U.S. Constitution is the most difficult to amend of any constitution currently existing in the world today. (Yugoslavia used to hold that title, but Yugoslavia did not work out.)

    Other nations routinely trade in their constitutions wholesale, replacing them on average every 19 years. By odd coincidence, Thomas Jefferson, in a 1789 letter to James Madison, once said that every constitution ?naturally expires at the end of 19 years because the earth belongs always to the living generation. These days, the overlap between the rights guaranteed by the Constitution and those most popular around the world is spotty.

    Americans recognize rights not widely protected, including ones to a speedy and public trial, and are outliers in prohibiting government establishment of religion.

    But the Constitution is out of step with the rest of the world in failing to protect, at least in so many words, a right to travel, the presumption of innocence and entitlement to food, education and health care.

    It has its idiosyncrasies. Only 2 percent of the world?s constitutions protect, as the Second Amendment does, a right to bear arms. (Its brothers in arms are Guatemala and Mexico.)

    The Constitution's waning global stature is consistent with the diminished influence of the Supreme Court, which is losing the central role it once had among courts in modern democracies, Aharon Barak, then the president of the Supreme Court of Israel, wrote in The Harvard Law Review in 2002.

    Many foreign judges say they have become less likely to cite decisions of the United States Supreme Court, in part because of what they consider its parochialism.  

    America is in danger, I think, of becoming something of a legal backwater, Justice Michael Kirby of the High Court of Australia said in a 2001 interview. He said that he looked instead to India, South Africa and New Zealand.

    Mr. Barak, for his part, identified a new constitutional superpower: Canadian law,  he wrote, serves as a source of inspiration for many countries around the world. The new study also suggests that the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, adopted in 1982, may now be more influential than its American counterpart.

    The Canadian Charter is both more expansive and less absolute. It guarantees equal rights for women and disabled people, allows affirmative action and requires that those arrested be informed of their rights. On the other hand, it balances those rights against such reasonable limits as can be demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society.

    Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia - The bill of rights of the former evil empire, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, was much better than ours,

    There are, of course, limits to empirical research based on coding and counting, and there is more to a constitution than its words, as Justice Antonin Scalia told the Senate Judiciary Committee in October. ?Every banana republic in the world has a bill of rights, he said.  

    The bill of rights of the former evil empire, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, was much better than ours, he said, adding: We guarantee freedom of speech and of the press. Big deal. They guaranteed freedom of speech, of the press, of street demonstrations and protests, and anyone who is caught trying to suppress criticism of the government will be called to account. Whoa, that is wonderful stuff!

    Of course,Justice Scalia continued, it's just words on paper, what our framers would have called a parchment guarantee.

  • CONSPIRACY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES: John Pau...
    by George Freund on July 4, 2016 at 11:30 AM
    4042 Views - 0 Comments

    PART 2:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUUiUhu72uo

    PART 3:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGScNikOL9w

    PART 4:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xP31tLFNKik

    PART 5:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMIPgNiDhwk

    PART 6:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMIPgNiDhwk

    PART 7:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPguXEv21q8

    PART 8:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHE_XHigysI

    PART 9:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xFP1VDCTis


    John Paul Jones is a Technicolor 1959 biographical epic film about John Paul Jones. The film was made by Samuel Bronston Productions and released by Warner Bros. It was directed by John Farrow and produced by Samuel Bronston from a screenplay by John Farrow, Ben Hecht, and Jesse Lasky Jr. from the story Nor'wester by Clements Ripley. The music score was by Max Steiner, the cinematography by Michel Kelber.


    The film starred Robert Stack in the title role, Marisa Pavan, Charles Coburn, Macdonald Carey, Jean-Pierre Aumont, David Farrar, Peter Cushing, Basil Sydney, Thomas Gomez and the director's daughter Mia Farrow in her film debut. Bette Davis made a cameo appearance as Empress Catherine the Great.


    The film begins with a United States Navy officer telling sailors the story of John Paul Jones.

    By age 17, John Paul (Robert Stack), a native of Scotland, is an experienced ship's navigator. In 1773, nine years later, he is master of a ship in the West Indies, but after an incident that results in the governor of Tobago advising him to leave, John Paul adds the surname Jones and goes to visit a brother who lives in Fredericksburg, Virginia.


    The brother has recently died. Jones hires his attorney, Patrick Henry (Macdonald Carey), to assist in business matters. He also takes a romantic interest in Henry's sweetheart, Dorothea Danders (Erin O'Brien).


    After serving as second-in-command of a man-of-war in the Bahamas, his adopted countrymen sign the American Declaration of Independence. Jones receives his first command, sets sail towards Newfoundland and seizes eighteen enemy ships, sending their supplies to American general George Washington (John Crawford).


    Washington sends the young officer to France, where he is appreciated for heroic feats at sea. Benjamin Franklin (Charles Coburn) then urges Jones to take a frigate and invade the British Isles. A new vessel is built for him at the suggestion of Marie Antoinette (Susana Canales), and the only condition of his majesty King Louis XVI (Jean-Pierre Aumont) is that Jones' ship sail under an American flag.


    Jones' successes ultimately lead him to Russia in 1790 at the behest of the empress, Catherine the Great (Bette Davis). He returns to Paris ill.

    A dying Jones, begins to dictate to Aimee (Marisa Pavan) the type of man required and training to be given a future United States Navy officer. The final scenes show the present day (1959) Midshipmen of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland. Admiral John Paul Jones gains acclaim as one of the bravest and most daring naval figures of his time and in the United States Navy of all time. John Paul Jones remains are located beneath in the Naval Academy Chapel rotunda in Annapolis, Maryland.

    HAPPY 4th OF JULY. REMEMBER WHAT IT WAS ABOUT. NEVER LOSE IT. THERE ARE ENEMIES BOTH FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC. THE TRAITORS ARE THE MOST LOATHSOME. GOD BLESS AMERICA. FORGIVE US FOR OUR TRESPASSES. KEEP HER FREE AND BLESSED.

  • CONSPIRACY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES: The Last...
    by George Freund on May 24, 2014 at 9:31 AM
    4041 Views - 0 Comments

    In one of Robert Redford's classics this film reveals what a corrupt system can do to a great patriot. However, the lesson plan is what can a great patriot do to the system. Consider it your training film should you enter FEMA detention. With many patriots in one location it is basic training for the restoration of the Republic. In the end WE WIN! Force of numbers and shear determination guarentee that.


    FULL MOVIE:

    http://hd.today/watch/ox1e94xN-the-last-castle.html

    http://www1.putlockersfm.com/watch/the-last-castle-2001-online-putlockers.html

    The Last Castle is a 2001 American action drama film directed by Rod Lurie, starring Robert Redford, James Gandolfini, Mark Ruffalo and Delroy Lindo.

    The film portrays a struggle between inmates and the warden of a military prison, based on the United States Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth. A highly decorated U.S. Army Lieutenant General, court martialed and sentenced for insubordination, challenges the commandant, a colonel, over his treatment of the prisoners. After mobilizing the inmates, the former general leads an uprising aiming to seize control of the prison.

    Plot

    Lieutenant General Eugene Irwin (Robert Redford) is brought to a maximum security military prison to begin a ten-year sentence for his decision (in violation of a presidential order) to send U.S. troops on a mission in Burundi, resulting in the deaths of eight soldiers. Colonel Winter (James Gandolfini), the prison's commandant, is a great admirer of the general but is offended by a comment he overhears: Irwin criticizes Winter's much-prized military artifacts collection, calling it something no actual battlefield veteran would ever have.


    Winter, who has never seen combat, resents the remark. He then takes exception to what he perceives as Irwin's attempt to change the attitudes of the prisoners, his admiration for Irwin fading fast. On one occasion, Irwin is punished harshly after stopping a guard from clubbing a prisoner, Corporal Ramon Aguilar (Clifton Collins, Jr.), who had made the mistake of saluting Irwin in the prison yard.

    Continuing to observe acts of cruelty, Irwin attempts to unify the prisoners by building a "castle wall" of stone and mortar at the facility, which in many ways resembles a medieval castle. Envying the respect Irwin is clearly receiving, Winter orders his guards to destroy the wall. Aguilar, directly involved in its construction, takes a stand before the bulldozer. Winter orders a sharpshooter to fire a normally non-lethal rubber bullet directly at Aguilar's head, killing him.


    After the wall is destroyed, Irwin and the inmates pay final respects to Aguilar in formation. Winter later tries to make amends with Irwin, who calls him a disgrace to the uniform and demands his resignation.

    The prisoners begin to behave like soldiers around Irwin, using code words and gestures, infuriating the commandant. Winter reaches out to an anti-social prisoner named Yates (Mark Ruffalo), a former officer and Apache helicopter pilot convicted of running a drug-smuggling ring. Yates is bribed to inform about Irwin's plans in exchange for a reduced sentence.


    Irwin organizes a plot to throw the prison into chaos. His intent is to show a friend, Brigadier General Wheeler (Delroy Lindo), the commandant's superior officer, that the commandant is unfit and should be removed from command under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. During a visit, Winter receives a letter threatening the kidnapping of General Wheeler by the prisoners. After ordering his men into action, Winter discovers that the scheme was a fake. Irwin orchestrated it as a way to detect how prison guards would react during an actual uprising.

    Yates becomes the key to their plan, tasked with stealing a U.S. flag from the warden's office and seizing a Bell UH-1 helicopter used by guards. The inmate revolt begins.


    Using improvised weapons—some resembling medieval ones, such as a trebuchet—and the tactics of a military unit, the prisoners capture an armored vehicle and the helicopter. The prisoners place a call to Wheeler's headquarters and inform him of the riot. Winter has little time to regain control before Wheeler will arrive to see the prison under siege. He orders the use of live ammunition against the prisoners.

    Winter knows from Yates that Irwin's ultimate goal is to raise the American flag upside down, a classic signal of distress. Irwin's men create havoc but ultimately are confronted by overwhelming numbers of guards, all armed with live ammunition. Knowing further resistance would only mean a massacre, Irwin orders the prisoners to stand down. Winter has successfully halted the uprising, but Irwin nonetheless elects to personally hoist the flag.


    Unable to make him stop, Winter orders his men to open fire on Irwin before the upside-down U.S. flag is flown. They refuse to do so on the orders of Winter's second-in-command, Captain Peretz. The colonel cannot persuade anyone else to follow his command, so he proceeds to shoot Irwin fatally himself.

    Peretz places the commandant under arrest. The prisoners salute the flag and Winter now sees that Irwin has actually raised the flag in the correct manner. It flies above the prison's walls as General Wheeler arrives and Colonel Winter is led away in handcuffs. The story ends with the inmates building a new wall as memorial to their fallen comrades. Aguilar and Irwin's names are among those carved onto the castle's wall.

  • National Geographic - The Secret Bible E...
    by George Freund on December 24, 2014 at 8:41 AM
    4038 Views - 0 Comments


    Episode 2: Rivals Of Jesus He healed the sick & raised the dead. His followers called him the Son of God. After his death, he rose again. He was Apollonius of Tyana, one of several preachers of the First Century who rivalled the following of Jesus.

    Apollonius of Tyana (Ancient Greek: Ἀπολλώνιος ὁ Τυανεύς; c. 15 – c. 100 CE[2]) was a Greek Neopythagorean philosopher from the town of Tyana in the Roman province of Cappadocia in Asia Minor. Little is known about him with certainty. Being a 1st-century orator and philosopher around the time of Christ, he was compared with Jesus of Nazareth by Christians in the 4th century[3] and by various popular writers in modern times.


    Life dates

    Apollonius was born into a respected and wealthy Greek family, his dates however are uncertain. His primary biographer, Philostratus the Elder (c. 170 – 247 CE) places him c. 3 BCE to 97 CE. Others agree that he was roughly a contemporary of Jesus of Nazareth. Charles P. Eells[7] states that his date of birth was three years before Jesus, whose date of birth is also uncertain. However, Philostratus, in his Life of Apollonius of Tyana, places him staying for a while in the court of King Vardanes I of Parthia, who ruled between c. 40 and 47 CE. Apollonius began a five-year silence at about the age of 20, and after the completion of this silence travelled to Mesopotamia and Iran. Philostratus also mentions emperors Nero, Vespasian, Titus, Domitian, and Nerva at various points throughout Apollonius’ life. Given this information, a timeline of roughly the years 15–98 CE can be established for his adult life.

    Comparisons with Jesus

    Biblical scholar Bart D. Ehrman relates that in the introduction to his textbook on the New Testament, he describes an important figure from the first century without first revealing he is writing about Apollonius of Tyana:


    Even before he was born, it was known that he would be someone special. A supernatural being informed mother the child she was to conceive would not be a mere mortal but would be divine. He was born miraculously, and he became an unusually precocious young man. As an adult he left home and went on an itinerant preaching ministry, urging his listeners to live, not for the material things of this world, but for what is spiritual. He gathered a number of disciples around him, who became convinced that his teachings were divinely inspired, in no small part because he himself was divine. He proved it to them by doing many miracles, healing the sick, casting out demons, and raising the dead. But at the end of his life he roused opposition, and his enemies delivered him over to the Roman authorities for judgment. Still, after he left this world, he returned to meet his followers in order to convince them that he was not really dead but lived on in the heavenly realm. Later some of his followers wrote books about him.

    Ehrman goes on to explain that Apollonius was a real person and that his followers believed Jesus to be a fraud. Sossianus Hierocles argued in the 3rd century that the doctrines and the life of Apollonius were more valuable than those of Christ, a viewpoint reportedly held by both Voltaire and Charles Blount during the Age of Enlightenment. In his 1949 book The Hero with a Thousand Faces, comparative mythology scholar Joseph Campbell lists both Apollonius and Jesus as examples of individuals who shared similar hero stories, along with Krishna, Buddha and others. Similarly, Robert M. Price in his 2011 The Christ-Myth Theory and its Problems, notes that the ancients often compared Jesus with Apollonius and that they both fit the mythic hero archetype. G.K. Chesterton, however, noted that the unique trial, suffering and death of Christ stand in stark opposition to the stories about Apollonius which he felt were very likely spurious.


    Historical facts

    With the exception of the Adana Inscription, little can be derived from sources other than Philostratus. As James Francis put it, "the most that can be said ... is that Apollonius appears to have been a wandering ascetic/philosopher/wonderworker of a type common to the eastern part of the early empire." What we can safely assume is that he was indeed a Pythagorean and as such, in conformity with the Pythagorean tradition, opposed animal sacrifice, and lived on a frugal, strictly vegetarian diet. A minimalist view is that he spent his entire life in the cities of his native Asia Minor and of northern Syria, in particular his home town of Tyana, Ephesus, Aegae[disambiguation needed], and Antioch, though the letters suggest wider travels, and there seems no reason to deny that, like many wandering philosophers, he at least visited Rome. As for his philosophical convictions, we have an interesting, probably authentic fragment of one of his writings (On sacrifices) where he expresses his view that God, who is the most beautiful being, cannot be influenced by prayers or sacrifices and has no wish to be worshipped by humans, but can be reached by a spiritual procedure involving nous (intellect), because he himself is pure nous and nous is also the greatest faculty of humankind.

    Miracles

    Philostratus implies on one occasion that Apollonius had extra-sensory perception (Book VIII, Chapter XXVI). When emperor Domitian was murdered on September 18, 96 AD, Apollonius was said to have witnessed the event in Ephesus "about midday" on the day it happened in Rome, and told those present "Take heart, gentlemen, for the tyrant has been slain this day...". Both Philostratus and renowned historian Cassius Dio report this incident, probably on the basis of an oral tradition.[citation needed] Both state that the philosopher welcomed the deed as a praiseworthy tyrannicide.


    Journey to India

    Philostratus devoted two and a half of the eight books of his Life of Apollonius (1.19–3.58) to the description of a journey of his hero to India. According to Philostratus' Life, en route to the Far East, Apollonius reached Hierapolis Bambyce (Manbij) in Syria (not Nineveh, as some scholars believed), where he met Damis, a native of that city who became his lifelong companion. Pythagoras, whom the Neo-Pythagoreans regarded as an exemplary sage, was believed to have travelled to India. Hence such a feat made Apollonius look like a good Pythagorean who spared no pains in his efforts to discover the sources of oriental piety and wisdom. As some details in Philostratus’ account of the Indian adventure seem incompatible with known facts, modern scholars are inclined to dismiss the whole story as a fanciful fabrication, but not all of them rule out the possibility that the Tyanean actually did visit India.

    What seemed to be independent evidence showing that Apollonius was known in India has now been proved to be forged. In two Sanskrit texts quoted by Sanskritist Vidhushekhara Bhattacharya in 1943 he appears as "Apalūnya", in one of them together with Damis (called "Damīśa"), it is claimed that Apollonius and Damis were Western yogis, who later on were converted to the correct Advaita philosophy. Some have believed that these Indian sources derived their information from a Sanskrit translation of Philostratus’ work (which would have been a most uncommon and amazing occurrence), or even considered the possibility that it was really an independent confirmation of the historicity of the journey to India. Only in 1995 were the passages in the Sanskrit texts proven to be interpolations by a modern (late 19th century) forger.


    Writings

    Several writings and many letters have been ascribed to Apollonius, but some of them are lost; others have only been preserved in parts or fragments of disputed authenticity. Porphyry and Iamblichus refer to a biography of Pythagoras by Apollonius, which has not survived; it is also mentioned in the Suda. Apollonius wrote a treatise On sacrifices, of which only a short, probably authentic fragment has come down to us.

    Philostratus' Life and the anthology assembled by Joannes Stobaeus contain purported letters of Apollonius. Some of them are cited in full, others only partially. There is also an independently transmitted collection of letters preserved in medieval manuscripts. It is difficult to determine what is authentic and what not. Some of the letters may have been forgeries or literary exercises assembled in collections which were already circulated in the 2nd century AD. It has been asserted that Philostratus himself forged a considerable part of the letters he inserted into his work; others were older forgeries available to him.


  • Neuschwabenland- A Nazi Endeavor (Part 2...
    by George Freund on February 17, 2012 at 10:16 PM
    4037 Views - 0 Comments

    PEOPLE I DON'T KNOW WHAT TO SAY. THIS IS THE REAL MCCOY. THESE ARE ACTUAL FILMS OF THE NAZI CAVES IN ANTARCTICA, THE SUB PENS, BLUEPRINTS, TESLA COIL POWER SYSTEM. I'M TOTALLY SPEECHLESS. ENJOY. IF YOU CAN MAKE COPIES DO SO.

  • INNOCENTS BETRAYED - The TRUE story of G...
    by George Freund on December 23, 2012 at 10:13 AM
    4036 Views - 0 Comments


    NEW REPLACEMENT LINK:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VBYmd30c7mY

    In this powerful documentary produced by Jews for the Preservation of Firearms Ownership (http://jpfo.org), you will learn how governments have historically deprived people of firearms ... and then wiped them from the face of the earth.

    This is the true story of Gun control from around the world, especially in the 20th century. It details how governments have ALWAYS BEEN the biggest threat to the safety, security and prosperity of the people. While Americans can see how this could happen in other countries, most can't EVER imaging it being able to happen here because there are so many rights guaranteed by the constitution. But that ONLY when the people STAND UP for those rights, because it's the nature of government to constantly try and TAKE them away from us.

    The producers of this film encourage copies of this film to be distributed as far and wide as possible, with the understanding that this permission is granted ONLY for non-commercial use. You can buy a DVD copy of this and other films at http://shop.jpfo.org/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=110 and http://jpfo.org/

    Our forefathers, weary of the oppressive measures that King George III's government forced upon them, in common declared their independence from England in 1776. They were not expected to be successful in that resistance. The moneyed people had backed England for two major reasons. First, our forefathers wanted a rigid, written Constitution "set in concrete."

    "No Free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms," wrote Thomas Jefferson.

    "Americans have the right and advantage of being armed ? unlike the citizens of other countries whose governments are afraid to trust the people with arms," argued James Madison.

    As Thomas Jefferson said "Experience has shown that even under the best forms of government those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted into tyranny".

    http://janmorganmedia.com/2012/12/the-documentary-that-shatters-gun-control-myths/

  • BBC THE WAR GAME 1965
    by George Freund on August 31, 2013 at 7:39 AM
    4033 Views - 0 Comments

    NEW LINK:

    http://www.watchfree.to/watch-12ec9-The-War-Game-movie-online-free-putlocker.html

    http://www.disclose.tv/action/viewvideo/167578/The_War_Game_1965/

    The War Game is a 1965 television documentary-style drama depicting the effects of nuclear war on Britain. Written, directed, and produced by Peter Watkins for the BBC's The Wednesday Play anthology series, it caused dismay within the BBC and in government and was withdrawn from television transmission on 6 August 1965 (the twentieth anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing). The Corporation said that "the effect of the film has been judged by the BBC to be too horrifying for the medium of broadcasting". However, it had some distribution in cinemas and won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature in 1966.[1] But it remained unshown in full on British television until 1985.

    The magic moment your children's eyeballs are boiled from the flash a third degree burn coursing the optic nerve to the brain. That's pain.

    Made in black-and-white with a running time of just under 50 minutes, The War Game depicts the prelude to and the immediate weeks of the aftermath to a Soviet nuclear attack against Britain. A Chinese invasion of South Vietnam starts the war; tensions escalate when the United States authorises tactical nuclear warfare against the Chinese. Although the Soviet and East German forces threaten to invade West Berlin if the U.S. does not withdraw that decision, the U.S. does not acquiesce to Communist demands and occupies West Berlin; two U.S. Army divisions attempt to fight their way into Berlin, but the Russian and East German forces defeat them in battle. The U.S. President launches a pre-emptive, NATO tactical nuclear attack. A limited nuclear war erupts between the West and the East; missiles strike Britain.


    The chaos of the prelude to the attack, as city residents are forcibly evacuated to the country, leads to the story's centre in Rochester, which is struck by an off-target missile aimed at Gatwick Airport. Key targets in Kent are RAF Manston and the Maidstone barracks, which are mentioned in scenes showing immediate effects of the attack. The results of that missile's explosion are the instant blinding of those who see the explosion, the resultant firestorm caused by the heat wave, and the blast front; later, the collapse of society, because of radiation sickness, psychological damage, and destroyed infrastructure; the British Army burns corpses, while police shoot looters during food riots.

    War is not a game. Don't let our leaders do it anymore lest you get the rebound effect of it.


  • CONSPIRACY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES: Mission ...
    by George Freund on July 26, 2015 at 8:53 PM
    4032 Views - 0 Comments


    FULL MOVIE:

    http://hd.today/watch/EdB3aVvj-mission-of-the-shark-the-saga-of-the-u-s-s-indianapolis.html

    When a top secret naval mission leads to the torpedoing of the U.S.S. Indianapolis at the end of WWII, it began one of the most scandalous court-martials in the history of the military. For five days the surviving crew members were left in the shark-infested waters, with only half of them surviving to be rescued. Their well-respected Captain accepted the responsibility to keep the scandal to a minimum but his court-martial only served to show that justice is not always found in military proceedings but rather mere expediency.


    Was the ship and crew wasted because they knew something from before the war?

    USS Indianapolis (CA-35) was a Portland class heavy cruiser of the United States Navy. She was named for the city of Indianapolis, Indiana.

    She was flagship for Admiral Raymond Spruance while he commanded the Fifth Fleet in battles across the Central Pacific. Her sinking led to the greatest single loss of life at sea in the history of the U.S. Navy. On 30 July 1945, after delivering parts for the first atomic bomb to the United States air base at Tinian, the ship was torpedoed by the Imperial Japanese Navy submarine I-58, sinking in 12 minutes. Of 1,196 crewmen aboard, approximately 300 went down with the ship.


    The remaining 900 faced exposure, dehydration, saltwater poisoning, and shark attacks while floating with few lifeboats and almost no food or water. The Navy learned of the sinking when survivors were spotted four days later by the crew of a PV-1 Ventura on routine patrol. Only 317 survived.


    Loss

    After major repairs and an overhaul, Indianapolis received orders to proceed to Tinian island, carrying parts and the enriched uranium (about half of the world's supply of Uranium-235 at the time) for the atomic bomb Little Boy, which would later be dropped on Hiroshima.[10] Indianapolis departed San Francisco on 16 July 1945, within hours of the Trinity test. Arriving at Pearl Harbor on 19 July, she raced on unaccompanied, delivering the atomic weapon components to Tinian on 26 July.

    Indianapolis was then sent to Guam where a number of the crew who had completed their tours of duty were replaced by other sailors. Leaving Guam on 28 July, she began sailing toward Leyte where her crew was to receive training before continuing on to Okinawa to join Vice Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf's Task Force 95.


    At 00:14 on 30 July, she was struck on her starboard bow by two Type 95 torpedoes from the Japanese submarine I-58, under the command of Mochitsura Hashimoto. The explosions caused massive damage. The Indianapolis took on a heavy list, and settled by the bow. Twelve minutes later, she rolled completely over, then her stern rose into the air, and she plunged down. Some 300 of the 1,196 crewmen went down with the ship. With few lifeboats and many without lifejackets, the remainder of the crew were set adrift.

    Navy command had no knowledge of the ship's sinking until survivors were spotted three and a half days later. At 10:25 on 2 August a PV-1 Ventura flown by Lieutenant Wilbur "Chuck" Gwinn and copilot Lieutenant Warren Colwell spotted the men adrift while on a routine patrol flight. Of the 880 who survived the sinking, only 321 men came out of the water alive; 317 ultimately survived. They suffered from lack of food and water (some found rations such as Spam and crackers amongst the debris), exposure to the elements (hypothermia, dehydration, hypernatremia, photophobia, starvation and dementia), severe desquamation, and shark attacks, while some killed themselves or other survivors in various states of delirium and hallucinations. "Ocean of Fear", a 2007 episode of the Discovery Channel TV documentary series Shark Week, states that the Indianapolis sinking resulted in the most shark attacks on humans in history, and attributes the attacks to the oceanic whitetip shark species. Tiger sharks might have also killed some sailors. The same show attributed most of the deaths on Indianapolis to exposure, salt poisoning and thirst, with the dead being dragged off by sharks.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Indianapolis_(CA-35)

  • THE NEWS STAGE: DEAD MAN GETS UP!
    by George Freund on October 8, 2013 at 8:38 AM
    4022 Views - 0 Comments

    I'm dead for the camera.

    I'm tired and have an itch. I better come back to life to scratch it.

    WORKS EVERY TIME!

    TOO BAD THE SOLDIERS SENT INTO THE FAKE WARS CAN'T COME BACK TO LIFE SO EASILY!!!

    The body of a dead U.S. Army soldier is covered with a plastic sheet after an attack on a highway leading west from the Iraqi capital of Baghdad July 16, 2003. One U.S. soldier was killed and two were wounded on in an explosion on a highway just west of the Iraqi capital Baghdad, U.S. soldiers on the scene said. Photo by Akram Saleh/Reuters

  • CONSPIRACY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES: Virus
    by George Freund on January 26, 2013 at 10:29 AM
    4016 Views - 0 Comments

     

    In light of a mysterious plane crash in Antarctica and resummation of the flu research, we present Virus again in case you missed it.

    Virus (復活の日 Fukkatsu no hi?), literally Day of Resurrection is a 1980 post-apocalyptic science fiction movie directed by Kinji Fukasaku and based on a novel written by Sakyo Komatsu in 1964. The movie starred Masao Kusakari, George Kennedy, Robert Vaughn, Chuck Connors, Olivia Hussey, Edward James Olmos, Ken Ogata, Glenn Ford and Sonny Chiba. The film is notable for being the most expensive Japanese film ever made at the time.

     

    The movie opens with a British nuclear submarine called the HMS Nereid entering Tokyo Bay in the then-future of December 1983. The ship's crew and Japanese seismologist Yoshizumi send a reconnaissance drone to search the city for any survivors, only to find decayed bodies. It also gathers air samples of something called MM88.

     

    After the movie credits, the film goes back to the then-future of February 1982, where a shady transfer is happening between an East German scientist, Dr. Krause, and a group of Americans. It is revealed that MM88 is a deadly virus created accidentally by an American geneticist that amplifies the potency of any other virus or bacteria it comes in contact with. The scientist wants a sample taken to a colleague in Switzerland, Dr. Leisenauer, so a vaccine can be developed. However, the Americans, who are actually secret agents, are only interested in recovering the MM88, which was stolen from a lab in the US the year before. Escaping an attack by East German soldiers (where Krause is killed), the spies crash their plane and the virus is released, creating a pandemic initially known as the "Italian Flu".

     

    The governments of the world watch helplessly as their citizens fall ill and die by the millions. Too late does American President Richardson learn from Senator Barkley and Dr. Meyer that the Italian Flu is in fact MM88, which had been part of a secret study for a new biological weapon led by Colonel Rankin.

     

    Within seven months, the world's entire population has died off except for 863 scientists and support personnel wintering in Antarctica. The virus becomes active at a warmer temperature than -10 degrees Celsius, and the polar winter has spared the 855 men and eight women stationed on the southern continent. The British nuclear submarine HMS Nereid, which was on patrol before the epidemic began, joins the scientists after sinking a Soviet submarine whose infected crew attempt to make landfall near Palmer Station.

     

    The survivors set up a government to deal with the realities of their situation, including the obvious problem of several hundred men living with only eight women. The film comes full circle when the Nereid heads for Tokyo Bay, on its first mission under the "Federal Council of Antarctica."

     

    However, just as the group begins to repopulate their new home, it is revealed that an earthquake will set off the United States nuclear arsenal, since Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman General Garland activated the Automated Reaction System (ARS) before his death, believing that the Soviet Union would use the confusion caused by the pandemic to attack on North America.

     

    The Soviets have their own version of the ARS and will fire off their weapons when the American missiles hit their targets. Unfortunately for the survivors, one of the Soviet missiles is aimed at Palmer Station, which is attributed to the Kremlin's erroneous belief that the research station was a cover for a secret missile base. Yoshizumi and Major Carter embark aboard the Nereid on a mission to shut down the ARS before the earthquake strikes, protected from MM88 by an experimental vaccine developed by Dr. Latour.

     

    The submarine arrives at Washington, D.C. and Yoshizumi and Carter make a rush for the ARS command bunker underneath the White House. They reach the room too late and all but a few men and the women (who left aboard an icebreaker at the same time as the Nereid) perish in the nuclear exchange. Over the course of years Yoshizumi walks back towards Antarctica. Upon reaching Tierra del Fuego in 1988,[1] he encounters the remaining survivors from the icebreaker, including Marit, a Norwegian widow he fell in love with after his pregnant girlfriend in Tokyo died from the epidemic.

     

     

  • El Cid - Love Theme (Miklós Rózsa)
    by George Freund on January 4, 2015 at 1:33 PM
    4015 Views - 0 Comments


    El Cid (1961) is a historical epic film, a romanticized story of the life of the Christian Castilian knight, Don Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar, called "El Cid" who in the 11th century fought the North African Almoravides and ultimately contributed to the unification of Spain. The film stars Charlton Heston in the title role and Sophia Loren as Doña Ximena.

    When a man loves a woman he says it in the immortal works of Miklós Rózsa one of the greatest composers of any era in my opinion.


    Sophia Loren and Charleton Heston starred in El Cid.

    So can you as the world unfolds.




241 - 252 of 4369 Videos